Friday, May 29, 2020

Trump’s immigration pause doesn’t go far enough

President Trump outlined details of his executive order temporarily halting legal immigration yesterday and this morning. He is signing the new order today and from those details, his administration has given so far, the order does not go nearly far enough nor solve the main issues of soon to be 30 million Americans looking for work.

The order only currently applies to immigrants applying for and wanting permanent stay here in the United States. So in other words, people that are going the legal route and paying a lot of money wanting to make America home. The United States admits on average about 1 million of these types of immigrants yearly.

What the order does not stop:  U.S. will still allow foreign workers to arrive through the H-2A visa program that delivers an endless flow of cheap labor to farmers.

Trump said regarding the H-2A visa program: “The farmers will not be affected by this at all,” Trump said. “If anything, we’re going to make it easier, and we’re doing a process for those workers to come in to go to the farm where they’ve been for a long time.”

The numbers:  Last year, U.S. farmers hired roughly 250,000 H-2A foreign visa workers. The H-2A program allows American farms to import endless numbers of foreign workers and pay them below-average U.S. wages. 

Munch More

The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits remained in the millions for an eighth straight week as the economy continued to reel from the coronavirus pandemic.

What happened: Initial jobless claims in state programs totaled 2.98 million in the week ended May 9, Labor Department figures showed Thursday.

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled a more than $3 trillion coronavirus aid package Tuesday, providing nearly $1 trillion in aid for states, cities, and local governments, aid to essential workers, and a new round of cash payments to individuals.

The proposal details are:

  1. Fresh round of $1,200 direct cash aid to individuals, increased to up to $6,000 per household.
  2. $175 billion housing assistance fund to help pay rents and mortgages.
  3. $75 billion more for virus testing.
  4. It would continue, through January, the $600-per-week boost to unemployment benefits.
  5. It adds a 15% increase for food stamps and new help for paying employer-backed health coverage.
  6. $3.6 billion to help local officials prepare for the challenges of holding elections during the pandemic.
  7. $10 billion more for the PPP
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A restaurant that opened for full service on Mother’s Day in defiance of state rules banning in-person dining was ordered closed by state health officials on Monday. Despite an order to close, Monday was another busy day for C&C Breakfast and Korean Kitchen in Castle Rock as they stayed open.

What happened: A video posted by Colorado Community Media showed people sitting at tables and waiting close together in a line at the counter while others lined up outside for a chance to get inside the eatery in Castle Rock about 30 miles south of Denver.

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Democrat Gov. Gavin Newsom just sent in a $1 Trillion relief package asking to the federal government. In tandem with that request, Newsom created the ‘Disaster Relief Assistance for Immigrants’, which includes $20 million for Los Angeles County. The Los Angeles area contains 31% of California’s undocumented population, which is the highest percentage of any area within the state, according to Newsom’s Disaster Relief for Immigrants Project fact sheet.

Newsom plans to give 150,000 adult undocumented immigrants a one-time stimulus payment of $500. The payments will be funded by a combination of taxpayer money and charitable contributions.

UCLA now to will be giving illegals cash: They plan to provide $200 universal impact awards to undocumented and international students using the University’s private and institutional grants.

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“F— Elon Musk,” was Democrat Assemblywoman’s Lorena Gonzalez’s response on Twitter at the news that entrepreneur Elon Musk planned to pull much of his company Tesla out of California.

What happened: Earlier Saturday, Musk wrote on Twitter that he planned to move Tesla’s headquarters and “future programs” to Texas and Nevada – adding that the company’s current facility in Fremont, Calif., in the San Francisco Bay area would remain open for some activity “dependent on how Tesla is treated in the future.”

Musk noted for his nearly 34 million Twitter followers that Tesla was “the last carmaker left in CA.” He referred to Tesla’s dispute with Alameda County, where Fremont is located, as “the final straw.”

 

 

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